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Black History Month Library Guide

In honor of Black History Month this Research Guide will show what is available at the San Diego Mesa College library and other community resources. People of all backgrounds and colors can learn from the content in this guide.

2022 THEME:BLACK HEALTH AND WELLNESS

The theme for 2022 focuses on the importance of Black Health and Wellness. This theme acknowledges the legacy of not only Black scholars and medical practitioners in Western medicine, but also other ways of knowing (e.g., birth workers, doulas, midwives, naturopaths, herbalists, etc.) throughout the African Diaspora. Read more

2021 THEME: THE BLACK FAMILY: REPRESENTATION, IDENTITY, AND DIVERSITY

The black family has been a topic of study in many disciplines—history, literature, the visual arts and film studies, sociology, anthropology, and social policy.  Its representation, identity, and diversity have been reverenced, stereotyped, and vilified from the days of slavery to our own time. Read more 

2020 THEME: AFRICAN AMERICANS AND THE VOTE

The year 2020 marks the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment and the culmination of the women’s suffrage movement.  The year 2020 also marks the sesquicentennial of the Fifteenth Amendment (1870) and the reinforcement of the right of black men to the ballot after the Civil War.  The theme speaks, therefore, to the ongoing struggle on the part of both black men and black women for the right to vote. 

2019 THEME: BLACK MIGRATIONS

Black Migrations emphasizes the movement of people of African descent to new destinations and, subsequently, to new social realities. While inclusive of earlier centuries, this theme focuses especially on the twentieth century through today.

2018 THEME: AFRICAN AMERICANS IN TIMES OF WAR

The 2018 theme, “African Americans in Times of War,” commemorates the centennial of the end of the First World War in 1918, and explores the complex meanings and implications of this international struggle and its aftermath. The First World War was initially termed by many as “The Great War,” “The War to End All Wars,” and the war “to make the world safe for democracy.”

2017 THEME: THE CRISIS IN BLACK EDUCATION

The theme for 2017 focuses on the crucial role of education in the history of African Americans.  ASALH’s founder Carter G. Woodson once wrote that “if you teach the Negro that he has accomplished as much good as any other race he will aspire to equality and justice without regard to race.” Woodson understood well the implications associated with the denial of access to knowledge, and he called attention to the crisis that resulted from persistently imposed racial barriers to equal education.